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What Your Period Color Says About Your Body

August 19,2020

It may be weird, but your period color changes. Period blood can appear in a range of different colors from black, brown, blue, or even orange. Although it’s completely normal to experience different colors of period blood, it is a reasonable cause for confusion and concern.

Period blood: Understanding the Colors

Any existing health conditions are more likely to change the length and timing of your period rather than the color. Nonetheless, there are a few reasons why period the appearance of period blood may change for some women.

For example, if your blood is in the uterus for longer than usual, it will react with oxygen and will likely change color—also known as oxidation. This type of bloody discharge will always appear to be darker.

What Does It Mean?

Your overall state of health and hormonal balance can affect your the consistency and color of your period blood. Although many women don’t enjoy menstruation as it often causes painful symptoms, your period is actually a great way to monitor your health and predict any health complications before it’s too late.

Black

If you usually experience a “normal period,” it can be very scary to see black blood. Black period blood is mostly caused by old blood that has built up within the uterus. Sometimes, your uterine lining starts to break, but blood doesn’t come out right away, causing it to take longer to expel from the vagina. When that blood finally does come out, it’s likely that it’s very dark, or even black.

Brown

Brown period blood is similar to black period blood, however, brown blood isn’t something to worry about. If you experience any brown blood during your period it could mean the flow of the blood was so slow it was oxidized—like rusting iron. During the beginning and end of your period, the speed of blood flow can get very slow. This is usually the time when you’ll notice brown period blood.

Orange

Orange period blood happens when it’s mixed with the cervical fluid. However, it could even mean implantation spotting that can happen after conception—generally 10 to 14 days. You should do a pregnancy test if you find spotting of orange blood between your periods.

Grey

Unlike dark or orange colored period blood, grey blood can be a cause for concern. As per some leading obstetricians-gynecologists, one of the most common reasons that make period blood look gray is from infection.

Grey blood comes when you’re dealing with treatable health conditions trichomoniasis or bacterial vaginosis. If you notice gray vaginal discharge or period blood, it’s best to consult with your OBGYN for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Join the Fibroid Fighters

If you are concerned about the color of your period blood, we understand. It can be difficult to know what is going on with your body without the proper resources and information. Although majority of abnormal period colors are not a reason for concern, it’s important to monitor the appearance of your period. Changes in menstruation could indicate an ongoing health condition like uterine fibroids.

If you are interested in learning more about fibroids, join the fibroid fighters today. If you have fibroids or had fibroid treatment before, we would love to hear from you! Share your story with us to help educate other women on how to find relief from painful fibroid symptoms.

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